Play Analysis / Critique - Introduction to Theatre - Mr. Dawursk

 


Format Specifications
(The Rules and Regulations):

·         Your Play Analyses must be DOUBLE SPACE typed and spell checked. Computers in the school labs are available before and after school and at lunch time. See Mr. Dawursk for any other times.

·         Grammar mechanics (capitalization, punctuation, and usage) must be correct.

·         Your name, period, and date must appear in the upper-right corner of the document.

·         Use only one staple in the upper-left corner to hold your report together. (No binders or covers, please.)

·         Do not illustrate your Play Analysis with graphics of any kind.

·         Please use Arial 12 point or Times New Roman 12 point font ONLY.

·         You must write the analysis as an essay and all responses must be in complete sentences and paragraphs. 
Be sure to respond completely to all parts of all questions.  The paper will be 2 to 3 pages on average.

 

Content:

 

Simple Answers: (complete sentences whenever necessary)

1.       What was the title of the play? (All play titles should be in italics or underlined.)

2.       Who was the playwright of the play? (Full Name)

3.       When was the play written or videotaped (Check the copyright date and publishing history page at the front of the play or on the video) OR when was it performed if in person?

4.       By whom (which publishing company) was this version of the play published or who produced the play (name the producer) if you watched it on video or in person?

5.       How many pages are in this written version of the play OR how long did the play run if you watched it on video or in person?

 

 

NOTE: Some sections below may be combined for better clarity and
some section parts below may not apply.  Use reasonable discretion.

 

Approximately One Paragraph for EACH Section Below:

6.       Describe the setting (time and place) of the play and the layout of the stage.

7.       Tell how many acts there are and what type of play it is: musical, farce, fantasy, tragedy, comedy, drama.

8.       Who was the protagonist (the central character who the play was most about BUT not always the “good” guy)? What were his/her most admirable traits? What obstacles was he/she faced with? How did he/she overcome them? If a “viewed” production, tell whether the actors portrayed the protagonist character convincingly (believably).  Consider the voice, diction, gestures, movements, reactions, mood, and spontaneity of the actor.

9.       Who was the antagonist (the person who caused the central conflict in the play)? How did this character cause conflict for the protagonist? If a “viewed” production, tell whether the actors portrayed the protagonist character convincingly (believably).  Consider the voice, diction, gestures, movements, reactions, mood, and spontaneity of the actor.

10.   Name all other main characters (other than the main protagonist or main antagonist) in the play? Describe two of them briefly.  If a “viewed” production, tell whether the two actors portrayed the two additional main characters convincingly (believably).  Consider the voice, diction, gestures, movements, reactions, mood, and spontaneity of the actor.

11.   Name the minor characters in the play. Describe two of them briefly.

12.   Clearly state one theme that is present in your play and explain why you think it is what the playwright is suggesting through his/her plot and characters.  You may present several themes if you wish. If a “viewed” production, did the director adequately convey that theme?

13.   If this was a “viewed” play, describe the use of staging (set, props, lights, costumes, make-up, effects, scene changes, sound quality and use of technology) in the production.  Did the staging enhance or deter from the playwrights intent?  Explain your answer. Give suggestions to improve the production.

14.   Write a one-paragraph review of the play. Explain the best and worst qualities of the play and the production if it was viewed. Why did you like it or dislike it? What sort of a person would enjoy this play? You may even create a “rating” scale and give it a rating if you want.

 

150 Word Plot Summary:

15.   Finally, write a 150-word summary of the play’s plot. Your summary should include a little bit about all the parts of the play, including the ending. Do not just write 140 words about the first act and then write, “...and if you want to know how it ends, you’ll have to see it yourself!”  Be complete.